Tag Archives: United States

Uncle Garry and the Heartbreakers

In August, I wrote a blog post about my Uncle Garry.  I am thinking of him with love tonight and want to repost this again today.  I hope you enjoy it as much as I do.

This summer, we went to see my Uncle Garry play in his band at the Broadalbin Hotel in Broad Albin by Sacandaga Lake.  He plays every Sunday.  The audience was a bit older than we were, but that didn’t stop one spry fellow to demonstrate his dancing prowess by throwing (literally) his dance partners during the square dance routine.  I am admittedly not versed in the art of square dancing, but up until that night I was not aware that there was a move that required the female partner to become airborne.  After a mild injury and an angry wife’s wrath (who was not the woman he was throwing up in the air) the fellow was persuaded to conclude this activity.  It was a HOOT.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

We had such a good time at this event!   My uncle has played guitar his whole life, yet as I sat there, I couldn’t remember ever hearing him play.  It was so nice just to watch him.  About six songs into the set, Uncle Garry started to sing.  Sing!  All of the ladies got really quiet and started “shushing” people so they could listen.  All at once I could see why.  Uncle Garry has got a set of pipes on him.  Dang, that boy can sing.  How had I missed this for so long!? 

Take a listen.  I am no videographer (obviously) so I apologize for the terrible quality.  

It is only a matter of time before Jay Leno sees this. 

What I loved about the evening is seeing a side of my Uncle that I could appreciate as an adult.  I love this guy and I am so glad to see him doing something that he loves so much and is so darned good at. 

To some he may just be an average Joe, but to many he is a celebrity in the Adirondacks

But more importantly, he is my uncle, who I love very much.  I am thinking of him tonight with love and prayers.

2 Comments

Filed under adult education, Alicia Legg, Continuing Education, No Adult Left Behind, Summer vacation

1st Grade

Here is what I’d like to know:  I’d like to know when I will be able to drop my son off for the first day of school and not come home in tears.  All of the other parents are happy and care free and I am sad that my boy is now away from me for the better part of the day until next June. 

YUCK.

I like my kid.  He is really cool.  I miss him when he is gone. ~~sniff, sniff~~

I know that makes me sad and pathetic. 

Tomorrow will be better.

6 Comments

Filed under adult education, No Adult Left Behind, Summer vacation

Uncle Garry and The Heartbreakers

On the first full day of Brit’s visit we went to see my Uncle Garry play in his band at the Broadalbin Hotel in Broad Albin by Sacandaga Lake.  He plays every Sunday.  The audience was a bit older than we were, but that didn’t stop one spry fellow to demonstrate his dancing prowess by throwing (literally) his dance partners during the square dance routine.  I am admittedly not versed in the art of square dancing, but up until that night I was not aware that there was a move that required the female partner to become airborne.  After a mild injury and an angry wife’s wrath (who was not the woman he was throwing up in the air) the fellow was persuaded to conclude this activity.  It was a HOOT.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

We had such a good time at this event!   My uncle has played guitar his whole life, yet as I sat there, I couldn’t remember ever hearing him play.  It was so nice just to watch him.  About six songs into the set, Uncle Garry started to sing.  Sing!  All of the ladies got really quiet and started “shushing” people so they could listen.  All at once I could see why.  Uncle Garry has got a set of pipes on him.  Dang, that boy can sing.  How had I missed this for so long!? 

Take a listen.  I am no videographer (obviously) so I apologize for the terrible quality.  

It is only a matter of time before Jay Leno sees this. 

What I loved about the evening is seeing a side of my Uncle that I could appreciate as an adult.  I love this guy and I am so glad to see him doing something that he loves so much and is so darned good at. 

To some he may just be an average Joe, but to many he is a celebrity in the Adirondacks.

Leave a comment

Filed under adult education, No Adult Left Behind, Summer vacation

A Dilly of a Camp

I have a predilection with Sacandaga Lake in the Adirondacks in upstate New York.  If you have ever been here you share this addiction. This lake is only about 30 minutes from where I grew up and this close proximity made the lake seem as though it was right in my back yard.  What is cool about this lake is that it is a man made reservoir.  In 1929, five farm villages were evacuated and subsequently flooded to create this lake.  This fact tantalizes the imagination of anyone who visits.   Legends of graveyards that were never adequately removed were a subject of great ghost stories by camp fires.  For years I believed that on a sunny day, if you knew where to look you could see the old steeple of a church at the bottom of the lake. 

Each year my aunt and uncle would rent a cabin for a week or two and my girlfriend and I would be invited to come up and share the camp with her.  These were old fashioned camps that could have been built in the 1950’s that had each their own character.  We’d sleep on cots on the porches after a great camp day.  One year we found an abandoned old camp with a sign that said, “This is a DILLY of a camp”.  What a hoot.  We pretended that this meant it was haunted and had some difficulty sleeping at night with a ghost so close. 

When you think of how short a week is it is hard to believe how one week can be so influential on a person’s life.  Whenever I visit Sacandaga Lake time becomes altered, in the very best possible way.  It stretches out.  The first thing that hits you when you come here is the smell of the air.  It is clean and has a permeation of suntan lotion, lush greenery, pine sap and camp fires.  That right there slows you down, and you stop to notice the beautiful trees that grow so high and sway back and forth in the slightest breeze.

When we spent the week our schedule went like this:  we’d get up obnoxiously early to go fishing and then spend the remainder of the day swimming and basking in the sun.  You would end the day with hot dogs by the fire and then watching an amazing sunset while fishing again. 

Occasionally you would find yourself in a local town getting needed supplies and feeling as if you were taking a step back in time, you would tour all of the mom and pop shops in that town.    

It is no surprise then that early on it became the mission of my husband and I to have a camp of our own one day.  My husband and his dad built ours just a few years ago – right down the road from my other Aunt.  It is a work in progress.  Despite this, we have had such good times with our friends and family here.  Each day I hope that my son looks upon this place with the same nostalgia that I have for camp and for Sacandaga Lake.  My camp is a dilly of a camp – and I love it because it brings me close to this lake.   

The Great Sacandaga Lake is simply part of my soul.  Being here restores my faith in a way that no Cathedral could produce. 

4 Comments

Filed under adult education, No Adult Left Behind, Summer vacation

Genuine gratitude for men braver than me

This is Memorial Day weekend.  It is a time to give thanks to all of the soldiers who have served honorably, who have passed.  I am grateful for the liberties they have provided to us.  In my opinion it is also a time to think of those who are uncomfortably overseas as I write this.  Two very dear friends of mine are in Afghanistan at this very moment.   I love them deeply.  I spent last Memorial Day with them by a campfire and they will be missed this year.  I will be thinking of them, missing them and giving thanks to them this weekend just as I do every day.

This was a good day for me to reflect on gratitude.  In my darkest hour, I can always find strength in gratitude.  My problems seem insurmountable  and my heart is heavy with matters that are just outside of my control right now.  Somehow, when I think of our soldiers, their bravery gives me strength to face whatever life throws my way.  I am grateful for that.  I am grateful for them.

I am grateful for my son and most of all, today and every day I am incredibly grateful for my amazing husband who is MY brave soldier. 

Nothing will ever change that.

May your holiday weekend be filled with wonderful memories and gratitude all your own.

1 Comment

Filed under adult education, No Adult Left Behind

Asra Nomani – Part Two

When Asra Nomani finished her speech she allowed offered a question and answer session.  Angry members of the audience took this opportunity to voice their opposition against Asra and her mission.  At first I was annoyed because of the rude nature of their questioning and then all at once I became very afraid.  I remembered the distracted guard.  I heard noises that indicated that the main entrance was not the only point of entry and perhaps someone could have slipped in the side door that would have terrible intentions.  I tried to calm myself with the fact that I have an exceedingly active imagination and I was in no real danger.  I just did not feel safe. My gaze darted around the room in paranoia as I tried to distinguish if anyone among the sea of faces would be the person that would intend to make good on their death threat against Asra Nomani. 

I have wondered often what people are thinking of right before they are victim to violence or terrorism.  Are they at peace?  Do they have a sense of foreboding?  With death as a certainty in each of our lives we may imagine what will lead to that event.  Do the victims of an attack say “Oh, this is it.  This is how I am meant to go.”  Because I thought that.  I wondered if Asra Nomani had thoughts of her own running through her head each time she led a discussion. 

My professor was the host for the evening.  He diplomatically wrapped up the Q&A session when he felt that it was appropriate.  As people filed out and fished for their car keys with the intention to return to their lives I felt the apprehension lift from me.

The evening ended with the only harm being at the hands of my own imagination.  I bought both of her books and stayed behind to have her sign my copy.  She spoke to me as she signed my book.  She asked me about myself and learned quickly that I had a son a year younger than her own. 

She looked deep into my eyes and asked me what role I take to ensure that my son is not brought up to perpetuate gender inequality.

Good question.

10 Comments

Filed under adult education, No Adult Left Behind

My final project for Crisis Management

The Leggacy Winery

My husband and I love wine and we love to sample new wines. We have visited the Finger Lake region in New York a couple of times to go on their various wine tours. It is so much fun and quite a beautiful trip.

Recently we discovered that a winery exists right in our backyard – The Saratoga Winery on Rt. 29 in Saratoga. One weekend we had a babysitter and ventured there with our friends. I loved this place! Better yet, I loved their wines. The Saratoga winery introduced us to a new type of wine called melomels that became my new favorite. They do a really amazing job with these. They are just so delicious.  If you like wine, you should check it out. www.thesaratogawinery.com

In any event during my visit I became intoxicated with the idea of making my own wine. That is how these guys started.

As it happened, my final project in my Crisis Communications class was to put together a crisis plan for a business. The idea is that we are all woefully unprepared for a crisis when it strikes and we should have a plan in place to handle it.

So the Leggacy (play on words using my last name as an inspiration) Winery was born. A fictitious winery inspired by The Saratoga Winery became my imaginary business. The idea is that if you think about as many possible crisis situations that could plague your business, then you are best prepared for a prevention plan to side step that crisis.

This business became very real to me. I started thinking that I could open a winery one day. I put together a really great crisis plan for this winery dealing with everything from customer intoxication to wine taint. I couldn’t stop. It was great fun.

If possible, I try to be practical in my efforts. In this way I like to take a course requirement and turn it into something that I could use one day. Now, I have never made a batch of wine, but I will when the semester is over. I may never open a winery, but maybe I will. I had a great romance with this idea as I developed this crisis plan. It was a really fun assignment.

1 Comment

Filed under adult education, No Adult Left Behind